LA Art Show 2015 Jan19

LA Art Show 2015

What: LA ART SHOW 2015 When: 01/14 to 18/2015 Where: Los Angeles Convention Center ***Please scroll down to view a photo slideshow from the event*** I also interviewed Kim Martindale, Director of LA Art Show for my radio program “Echo in the Sense”. Click here to listen! Review: The LA Art Show is an all-inclusive, multi-faceted and multi-day event that anchors LA Arts Month. You have artwork from modern to contemporary, from prints, painting, and sculpture, to video and installation. It is also the first year of a partnership between the LA Art Show and the Palm Beach Show Group. The Palm Beach Show Group brought the Los Angeles Jewelry, Antique & Design Show to the LA Convention Center to coincide with this year’s LA Art Show. Highlights from this year’s show include a gala Opening Night Premiere Party, Dialogs LA – Lecture Series and a Featured Guest Country. At the center of the fair was a canopy of large Arabian tents where tired fairgoers could lounge and enjoy the hospitality of this year’s guest country, the United Arab Emirates. Fairgoers were served a heady and strongly flavored coffee and platters of the best dates sat on the low tables for all to eat. The Dialogs LA lecture series featured a lecture by Rodrigo Ribera d’Ebre about a new arts movement native to Los Angeles called Dark Progressivism. Dark Progressivism comes out of the urban and racial turmoil of the 1980s and 1990s as seen in the Los Angeles Riots. His thesis and the synopsis for a self-titled film is that murals, graffiti, tattoos, and Cholo culture and lettering styles and philosophies that originate from Los Angeles and from a certain group of LA artists have had a global impact. Another highlight of the fair was a cluster of galleries called Littletopia curated by Noah Antieau of Red...

Photo LA 2015 – Claudia James Bartlett Interview...

This was originally broadcast on my radio program “Echo in the Sense” on January 11th. Please use the flash player to listen to my interview about Photo LA with Claudia James Bartlett. If you don’t have flash, you can also click on the link below: –> LINK (click here) About Photo LA (from Photo LA website): The international photographic art exposition photo la returns for its 24th year at The REEF, located in the historic LA Mart building in downtown Los Angeles, January 15 – 18, 2015. Downtown LA has become an international destination for art patrons and enthusiasts. In addition to photo la and the LA Art Show, downtown LA will also welcome the highly anticipated opening of the new Broad Museum in 2015, along with the ongoing arrival of new cutting-edge and blue-chip galleries, such as Hauser Wirth & Schimmel. Inspired by downtown’s growing vitality and creative energy, photo la relocated to The REEF for its 2014 edition, attracting an unprecedented attendance of 16,000 guests. The 2015 edition of photo la will expand its uniquely diverse and far-reaching showcase of photographic art, ranging from 19th Century works to contemporary and innovative photography-based art. Alongside galleries, dealers, museums, and nonprofit organizations, photo la will also expand its acclaimed programming to include more lectures, roundtable discussions, special installations, and docent tours with distinguished members of the photographic/arts community. This year, photo la is pleased to honor Catherine Opie, and the fair’s exclusive VIP opening gala will celebrate her lifelong contributions to the arts. Additionally, all proceeds from the opening gala will go towards photo la 2015 beneficiary The United Way of Greater Los Angeles and The Painted Brain. About Claudia James Bartlett (from LinkedIn): Since receiving her B.A. in Art from the University of Washington,...

LA Art Show – Kim Martindale Interview...

This was broadcast on my radio program “Echo in the Sense” on Sunday, January 11, 2015 on KXLU Los Angeles 88.9 FM and www.kxlu.com. Please use the flash player to listen to my interview about the LA Art Show with Kim Martindale. If you don’t have flash, you can also click on the link below: –> LINK (click here) About The LA Art Show (from LA Art Show website): The LA Art Show, the 200,000 square foot art fair that welcomed more than 50,000 art enthusiasts to the Los Angeles Convention Center last year, will celebrate its 20th Anniversary at the upcoming 2015 event. Founded in 1994, the show has grown from a small regional event featuring 14 galleries to become the largest and longest running platform for fine art, bringing in more than 120 galleries representing 22 countries. Looking back on the 20 year history of the LA Art Show, one can’t help noticing how it has evolved, changing locations and growing in diversity to reflect the trajectory of the burgeoning Los Angeles art scene. In a major departure from art fairs of the time, the LA Art Show was the first and only event to strategically incorporate galleries representing diverse art genres, broadening its audiences to include enthusiasts of: modern, contemporary, historic and traditional works, as well as works on paper, sculpture and installations, in one art fair. This show format was specifically selected to meet the needs of the LA market. And, it has paid off with attendance and galleries increasing year over year. This out-of-the-box thinking has been a hallmark of the show production team, which has consistently developed programming and special exhibition content, that following its debut at the LA Art Show, has grown to acclaim in the international art...

Cosmic Krylon Carnival – Kenny Scharf & Merry Norris at Pasadena Museum of Art Nov09

Cosmic Krylon Carnival – Kenny Scharf & Merry Norris at Pasadena Museum of Art...

Scroll down for photos and video of the event. When: November 08, 2014 Where: Pasadena Museum of Art It was a flashback Saturday night at the Pasadena Museum of Art benefit, Cosmic Krylon Carnival, honoring Kenny Scharf and Merry Norris. Kenny Scharf established himself in the New York 80s art scene. He was a contemporary of Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His street art/pop aesthetic can be seen on the first floor in the parking garage of the Pasadena Museum of California Art. This permanent installation called Kosmic Kavern and the landscape of characters that he spray painted on the walls of the garage were like a gleeful but mute audience for the goings on of the evening. The theme for the evening revolved around a cast of carny folk and there were palm readers, jugglers, strong men, and unicyclists weaving in and out of the crowd. Carny food was served up including hotdogs and waffles, ice cream, popcorn, Sprinkles Cupcakes. To add further nostalgia to the night, the DJ spun old punk rock records to an empty dance floor. In attendance, were the owners of the building, Bob and Arlene Oltman, who recounted their quest to move closer to the heart of Pasadena and their subsequent desire to establish a museum. There were several sharply dressed female members of the Pasadena Arts Council who talked about their non-profit’s philanthropic giving over the years. The highlight of the evening came in the middle with a performance by Kenny Scharf. Scharf painted one of his cartoon characters on an old BMW. Scroll down for photo slideshow and videos. Photo Credit: Christine Palma Video Credit: Christine...

Paul Cézanne’s Still Life with Apples and Oranges Oct31

Paul Cézanne’s Still Life with Apples and Oranges...

Paul Cézanne was well aware of the symbolic meanings attached to the fruit he chose to paint when he made Still Life with Apples and Oranges. He also had to know that in choosing apples and oranges as his subject and by including “apples and oranges” in the title for this painting, he would be making a direct allusion to the idiom “comparing apples to oranges.” The European French for this is close enough: “comparer des pommes et des poires (to compare apples and pears).”1 The idiom refers to the differences between two unlike items. It can also refer to a false analogy where apple is like orange, but is a poor example of orange. A third possibility is that we take the idiom as a subjective statement, as if to say, apples and oranges should not be compared. Loaded with these idiomatic possibilities, what could Cézanne be talking about? Looking at Cézanne’s working method, we find that he painted mostly from direct observation. He often painted the same subject matter and his preoccupation was in exploration of formal and pictorial elements. He is said to be as accomplished painting still life, as he was with landscape and portraiture. The enigma is in Cézanne’s nudes. Throughout his career, he avoided painting nude models as much as possible. He even confessed to Renoir, “Women models frighten me.”2 Instead, he worked from old drawings of nudes he sketched while still in school or he copied from the nude drawings of other artists. Some of his nudes, he paints without faces and he is ambiguous about defining gender. We can look at how the subject of Cézanne’s Still Life with Apples and Oranges has been abstracted to simplified rounded organic forms defined by hue modeling and line....

Marc Chagall’s Adam and Eve and The Forbidden Fruit Oct31

Marc Chagall’s Adam and Eve and The Forbidden Fruit...

Marc Chagall’s Adam and Eve and The Forbidden Fruit builds upon Western biblical tradition and on art historical precedent in depicting mankind’s fall from grace. Coaxed by a serpent, Eve offers Adam forbidden fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden of Eden. Neither the Jewish Torah, nor the Christian Old Testament specifies which fruit. Some scholars believe it is a grape, others that it is a fig, but regardless, the majority accept the apple as an appropriate stand-in, rich with symbolic meaning. In painting, the use of the apple as symbol can be traced to Renaissance artists who appropriated elements of Greek mythology. Hercules retrieved the golden apples of the Hesperides, said to confer eternal youth, as his eleventh labor. Paris declared Aphrodite winner of a beauty contest by awarding her a golden apple in exchange for Helen of Troy whose kidnap would spark the Trojan War. While the apple is also associated with Aphrodite and with love, in biblical context it symbolizes the fall of man and original sin, loss of innocence, knowledge including sexual knowledge, and temptation. Apple as a pejorative symbol is further reinforced by its Latin etymology: mālum is a noun and means “apple,” but change the accent on the first vowel and mălum becomes the adjective for “evil.” “Adam and Eve with the forbidden fruit,” WIKIART, http://www.wikiart.org/en/marc-chagall/adam-and-eve-with-the-forbidden-fruit-1960#close ,...

Sarah Lukas’ Au Naturel Oct24

Sarah Lukas’ Au Naturel...

Scroll down for image. Sarah Lucas’ Au Naturel installation created in 1994 takes a stab at the post-feminist dilemma. The Feminism (capital “F”) of the Judy Chicagos, of the 1970s and 1980s, demanded a united front; it called for courage, resolve, and a bullhorn. Now that, more or less, the outward signs that the broader strokes of the feminist agenda have been achieved, such as parity in the workplace and in educational opportunity, feminists might ask, what sort of political voice is appropriate at the beginning of the 21st century. One answer is to take an autobiographical approach to the problem, one that embraces the push-pull between culture and anti-culture. For Lucas, this is found in her working class roots. It is also her sometimes rude and sometimes wry British sense of humor. Think Benny Hill. Au Naturel is a shabby full size mattress slumped halfway up against the gallery wall. Two melons and a bucket on the left side represent a “her.” Two oranges and a cucumber represent a “him.” It is a visual pun that reduces a man and a woman lying in bed together to their sexual organs. It is accessible on the surface level of visual pun as simple fiction. It is easy enough for the viewer to suspend their disbelief and take at face value this direct one-to-one substitution. Outside of the visual pun, there does not appear to be any irony in the piece and Lucas also does not appear to take a moral position. Instead, through the plain speech of these “low” objects, “au naturel,” she arrives at an objective truth about this encounter. What you see is what you get: Just a snapshot of a male / female relationship, non-glamorous, functional, and perhaps as suggested by...

LAXART Gala at the Greystone Mansion Sep28

LAXART Gala at the Greystone Mansion...

What: LAXART Gala When: 09/27/2014 Where: Greystone Mansion, Beverly Hills ***Please scroll down to view a photo slideshow and videos from the event***   Review:   The surreal flavor of the evening begins with the shuttle ride from the Beverly Hills Public Library parking lot to the Greystone Mansion. In the same tongue-in-cheek deadpan as what you might find at the Museum of Jurassic Technology, an older female docent stands up at the front of the shuttle as a representative of The Historical Society of the Desert to pitch walking tours of the Doheny Estate aka Greystone Mansion. She does this with gusto. At the end of her speech she hands out booklets that have chapters with oblique references to the estate and the Doheny family. Artist Jason Metcalf is credited with reprinting this out of circulation pamphlet. Rousing cowboy music plays just a notch too loud over the shuttle’s speakers for the remainder of the ride. Once at Greystone Mansion, I am greeted by a full size black Hummer SUV with a flat tire. The tire appears to be made of either 24 karat gold or brass. Perhaps Sculptor Ry Rocklen is making a reference to a “Cinderella,” maybe we are the VIPs, arriving at the gala just in time with curbside service. The golden flat tire also serves as a reminder that we are in Beverly Hills after all and our playground for the evening is for an exclusive audience. At the mansion’s entrance, I hear the celebratory pop of a cork flying from a champagne bottle. A waiter in a white tuxedo climbs a ladder and pours the golden liquid onto the top of the Isaac Resnikoff sculpture consisting of a tall pyramid of champagne glasses installed tabletop and lit from below. Very...

Manfred Muller’s “Twilight and Yearning” beneath the Santa Monica Pier Aug08

Manfred Muller’s “Twilight and Yearning” beneath the Santa Monica Pier...

I though I would repost some art writing from my Echo in the Sense website here: October 9, 2006 Much of 2004 was spent taking long walks along the Santa Monica pier and wallowing in a tide of inertia. I came upon this installation for the first time this January at a time when I very much needed a mental jog from the past. The boat sculpture/permanent installation in these photos is Manfred Muller’s “Twilight and Yearning.” I had the opportunity to hear him lecture at Form Zero bookstore in 1994 and he mentioned the boats under the pier. He first proposed it to the Santa Monica City Council in 1992, but it still took several years for the city to greenlight his project. I still remember the gallery pieces I saw ten years ago at Form Zero. Each was about a foot high made of cardboard or felted paper; they were gate-folded and scored, duplexed with a contrasting color on one side, and shapes were cut out. Each one was like a present or a large banana leaf folded over on itself. He was working on a series of not quite assemblage pieces, a visual pun on figure and ground and enclosure and these had an architectural feel or a very tangible sense of being a part of a larger dialogue. These very much reminded me of the maquettes of sculptor Betty Gold and her process of arriving at her monumental public sculpture pieces: reduction from a very basic shape; she usually starts from a rectangle.  With some of Muller’s pieces, complexity is dependent on audience reference points; how personal and social memory weaves itself in relation to form. Sculpture magazine has a meaty critique of where his work is in the present. The USC Fischer Gallery has a catalogue page with...

Nam June Paik’s Seminal “Moon is the Oldest TV” Aug08

Nam June Paik’s Seminal “Moon is the Oldest TV”...

August 28, 2007 In homage to this morning’s Full Moon Lunar Eclipse (2 to 4 AM), a revisit of Nam-june Paik’s video installation, “Moon is the Oldest TV,” feels appropriate. Moon is The Oldest Television – 1965-67 (1996) Nam-june Paik TV Moniter,projector and video I. The Moon vis-à-vis the Beholder In 1963 America put the first man on the moon, an event broadcast live on television sets around the world. That year, that day, that hour and even those minutes are punched into the timeclock of global consciousness. Two years later, Paik reflects on this event with “Moon is the Oldest TV.”   The installation is composed of a single row of Philco television sets on individual pedestals. On their screens play a progression of reprocessed black-and-white video footage from full moon to new moon. The moon as television becomes a metaphor for a philisophical view of parallax. Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Zizek(writes) in his work The Parallax View, “…the observed distance is not simply subjective, due to the fact that the same object which exists “out there” is seen from two different stances, or points of view. It is rather that, as Hegel would have put it, subject and object are inherently mediated so that an “epistemological” shift in the subject’s point of view always reflects an ontological shift in the object itself. Or -to put it in Lacanese– the subject’s gaze is always-already inscribed into the perceived object itself, in the guise of its “blind spot,” that which is “in the object more than object itself”, the point from which the object itself returns the gaze. Sure the picture is in my eye, but I am also in the picture.   Denial is also an extention of parallax and the moon landing as a staged event is a rock that revisionist historians(negationism) cling to. (Click here for  video from Moon Hoax Documentary – Fox News.)  As I contemplate Paik’s installation and the mythos of moon watching, I am immediately drawn to the Apollo Moon Landing hoax accusations which claim the Apollo Moon landings were faked by NASA. From Wikipedia: A year after the first moon landing, Knight Newspapers conducted a poll of 1721 U.S. citizens and found that more than 30 percent of all of the poll’s respondents were “suspicious of NASA’s trips to the Moon” with the number rising to over half in some demographic areas. The Newsweek article that published the poll results noted that among the respondents were “an elderly Philadelphia woman who thought the moon landing had been staged in an Arizona desert” and a “housewife” whose suspicions were based on her belief that her television could not “receive signals from the moon.” Another respondent said, “It’s all a deliberate effort to mask problems at home . . . the people are unhappy – and this takes their minds off their problems.” …   Fox television’s 2001 TV special “Conspiracy Theory: Did We Really Land on the Moon?” … said roughly 20 percent of the public had doubts about the authenticity of the Apollo program…   A Dittmar Associates poll in 2006 showed that among 18-26 year old college-educated students “27 percent expressed some doubt that NASA went to the Moon, with 10 percent indicating that it was ‘highly unlikely’ that a Moon landing had ever taken place.”   James Oberg, an American journalist who writes about space (and has worked for NASA’s space shuttle program), estimates that “perhaps 10 percent of the population, and up to twice as large in specific demographic groups” believe in the hoax or have some doubts about the Apollo program “It’s not just a few crackpots and their new books and Internet conspiracy sites,” Oberg said in 1999. “There are entire subcultures within the U.S., and substantial cultures around the world, that strongly believe the landing was faked. … Our American culture’s shifting regard for both the physical truth and the unifying vision of the Apollo Moon Landing just in the last 45-years, speaks to a jadedness deep in our belief system. We fear being conned. We keep one hand on...

Free Museum Days!

Free ALL THE TIME: UCLA Hammer Museum, Westwood, Los Angeles California African American Museum, Exposition Park, Downtown Los Angeles California Science Center, Exposition Park, Downtown Los Angeles The Getty Center, Brentwood, Los Angeles The Getty Villa, Pacific Palisades Griffith Observatory Hollywood Bowl Museum The Los Angeles Fire Department Museum, Hollywood, only open Saturdays 10-4 MOCA Pacific Design Center, West Hollywood Museum of Television and Radio, Beverly Hills Muckenthaler Cultural Center, Fullerton The Nethercutt Collection and Nethercutt Museum, Sylmar Santa Monica Museum of Art (Suggested $5 donation), Santa Monica STARS Center Sheriff’s Museum, 11515 Colima Rd. at Telegraph Rd., Whittier UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, Los Angeles   Free on WEDNESDAYS: Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, Claremont – Free Wednesdays   Free on THURSDAYS: Japanese American National Museum, Little Tokyo, Los Angeles – Every Thursday 5 to 8 pm, and 3rd Thursday all day Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Downtown Los Angeles – Free every Thursday from 5 to 8 pm MOCA Geffen Contemporary, Downtown Los Angeles – Free every Thursday from 5 to 8 pm Skirball Cultural Center – Free Thursdays noon – 9 pm   Free on FRIDAYS: Long Beach Museum of Art – Free Friday Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach – Free on Fridays, check website for Free Family Sundays   Free ONCE A MONTH (see listing): Autry National Center: Museum of the American West in Griffith Park, Los Angeles – the 2nd Tuesday of the month Bowers Museum, Santa Ana – First Sunday of the month is Target Free First Sunday. Craft and Folk Art Museum, Mid Wilshire, Museum Row, Los Angeles – First Wednesday George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles – Free the first Tuesday of the month Huntington Library,...

Art Platform Los Angeles...

When: September 27, 2012 Where: Barker Hanger Broadcast Date: October 8, 2012   Scroll down to view images from the fair. This was broadcast on my radio program, Echo in the Sense, on KXLU Los Angeles 88.9 FM on October 8, 2012. Click below to listen: –>LINK TO AUDIO Summary – I conducted a few interviews at Art Platform Los Angeles: • Rachel Lee Hovnonian, Artist, on our synthetic existence. I also have live audio from her performance piece, a virtual cafe called Mud Pie. • Laura Blereau, Director of Bitforms Gallery (NY), about Bitforms, The Kitchen, Issue Project Room and on several of their artists: Daniel Canogar, Erwin Redl, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer and R. Luke DuBois. • Jason Ramos – Director of RAID Projects (LA) and one of the curators from ARTRA Curatorial about Co-Lab, a collection of non-profit galleries and collectives. He introduces these groups and artists: Gallery Lara from (Tokyo) and Jaus Gallery (Los Angeles) and their artist Satoshi Saegusa and Mitsuko Ikeno; Weekend Gallery (Los Feliz, Los Angeles) and their artist Carlson Hatton; Durden and Ray and their artists John Flack, Emily Counts and Max Presneill; PS (Amsterdam); Tilt-Export (Portland, Oregon) with director Jenene Nagy and their artists Ben Buswell and Lauren Clay; Felt Space (Adelaide, Australia); Neter Proyectos (Mexico City) and their artists Axel Velasquez, Alejandro Garcia, Jimenez Lefer, Marcos Castro, Ramiro Chavez, Alex Volio, Mariana Magdaleno, Greta Gamboa, Carlos Olvera, and Christian Castaneda; RAID Projects (Los Angeles) and directors Jason Ramos and Max Presneill and their artists Stephen Parise (Sweden) and Tom Dunn (Australia). • I also play a Steve Roden composition that was commissioned by XOjet that was played in a Challenger 300 jet during opening night.   My Review of Art Platform Los Angeles: I found Art Platform Los...

Hello Kitty 50th Anniversary Jul26

Hello Kitty 50th Anniversary...

When: 11/12/2010 Where: Barker Hanger, Santa Monica, CA Scroll down to see photos from the exhibit: Hello Kitty brand was launched in 1974 by Sanrio Company, Ltd. Yuko Shimizu is the designer. Kawaii, which means cute, adorable and lovable (1), is an aesthetic which dominates Japanese pop culture. This influence has caught on globally. Today Sanrio earns over $1 billion annually in sales outside of Japan. Perhaps the power of Hello Kitty lies in nostalgia for childhood innocence. The target market, besides little girls, are young women. In an interview, journalists Ken Belson and Brian Bremner, co-authors of the book “Hello Kitty: The Remarkable Story of Sanrio and the Billion Dollar Feline Phenomenon” say that some commentators speculate that Hello Kitty is a girl power movement focused on whimsy and consumption, and that it is a by-product of mid-1970s consumerism in Japan and the rise of a class of young people with disposable incomes.(2) Hello Kitty’s passive expression never changes; she has no mouth and she does not speak. Her gaze is always directed out at the viewer and her face has no profile view. Beneath that gaze, Hello Kitty is either an impenetrable mystery or a blank slate. And so we are able to behold Hello Kitty as a logo and an icon. She can be found on everything from waffle makers to car seat covers to children’s pencil cases. A “classic,” she represents shared female history, from mother to daughter, from girl to girl. Hello Kitty’s apparel and accoutrements gets a makeover from year to year, and as such, she becomes fashion icon and collectible. Traditionally and a little less so today, Hello Kitty is in limited supply and acquires a high exchange value. On the other hand, contrary to this, over...